Complete chart following example ….Week 6 Assignment

Research Concepts Matrix
Please note that the first row of data is meant as an example. Please read the example article (Garriott, Hudyma, Keene, & Santiago, 2015) as a guide for how to dissect each article assigned.

Reference

Purpose of the study

Statement of the Problem

Limitations/Implications

Ethical Conduct in the Study

Future research possibilities (e.g., how could a researcher extend the research detailed in the study)

Garriott, P. O., Hudyma, A., Keene, C., & Santiago, D. (2015). Social cognitive predictors of first and non-first-generation college students’ academic and life satisfaction. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 62(2), 253-263. https://doi.org/10.1037/cou0000066

The purpose of the study was to extend the literature on the utility of 

Lent’s (2004)

 normative model of well-being in predicting the academic and life satisfaction of college students and to test the full model replicate past findings with previous samples.

Many first-generation college students experience higher education differently than their non-first-generation peers They may have different qualities than fellow students who aren’t first generation including being enrolled in college part-time, lower-income, less active in extracurricular activities, and less academically prepared.

The sample was not very diverse—it was predominantly white students which didn’t represent the typical first-generation students limiting generalizability and females were over-represented. Because of the study sites being oriented toward first-generation students, the participants may have reported more support than if there were in other university settings.

Researchers gained IRB approval, site permission from university administration and offered an incentive of entry into a raffle to win one of 10 $25 gift cards. Participants could choose not to answer questions about gender.

Future studies could examine actual support rather than just perceived support. A longitudinal study could see long term effects of support. And, research on actual interventions might be useful as well.

Johnson, S. R., & Stage, F. K. (2018). Academic engagement and student success: Do high-impact practices mean higher graduation rates? Journal of Higher Education, 89(5), 753-781.https://doi.org/10.1037/cou0000066

Olive, T. (2014). Desire for higher education in first-generation Hispanic college students enrolled in a graduate counseling program. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology, 45(1), 72–91.

Schelbe, L., Swanbrow Becker, M., Spinelli, C., & McCray, D. (2019). First generation college students perceptions of an academic retention program. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 19(5), 61–76.

Smith, K. J., Emerson, D. J., Haight, T. D., Mauldin, S., & Wood, B. G. (2019). An examination of the psychometric properties of the Connor-Davidson resilieJournal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Vol. 19, No. 5, December 2019, pp. 61-76.
doi: 10.14434/josotl.v19i5.24300

First Generation College Students’ Perceptions
of an Academic Retention Program

Lisa Schelbe
Florida State University

lschelbe@fsu.edu

Martin Swanbrow Becker
Florida State University

Carmella Spinelli
Florida State University

Denesha McCray

Abstract: This qualitative study examines the perceptions of students enrolled in a campus-based
program designed to promote academic success and retention of first generation college students. Method:
Twenty-five undergraduate students in the program participated in focus groups and interviews to share
their perceptions and experiences. Research team members conducted a thematic analysis on the focus
groups and interviews transcripts. Findings: Students reported program components that contributed
to their academic success and retention including support, expectations, resources, and preparation.
Students also described concerns about how students’ needs changed over time and how students in the
program were perceived on campus.

Keywords: First generation college students; higher education; retention; college transition; academic
success

First-generation college students are the first in their family to attend college–neither parent has
attended college nor has been awarded a college degree (Padgett, Johnson, & Pascarella, 2012;
Stebleton, Soria, & Huesman, 2014). The strengths and resiliency of first generation students cannot
be overstated as many have overcome substantial obstacles to pursue higher education. In 2010, an
estimated 4.5 million first generation college students were enrolled in colleges and universities in the
United States (Pryor, Hurtado, DeAngelo, Blake, & Tran, 2011). With the high number of first
generation students, college and university administrations increasingly have recognized that these
students face different challenges and needs when compared to their peers (Pryor et al., 2011; Reid &
Moore, 2008; Stebleton et al., 2014).

Once enrolled, first generation students are four times more likely than their peers to drop out
at the end of their first year (Engle & Tinto, 2008). This trend is not unique to the first year experience
as compared to their peers with parents who graduated from college, using national data sets, first
generation college students were found to be 8.5 time more likely to drop out of college during the
first four years at college (Ishitani, 2006). A study also using national data found at the end of five
years in higher education, first generation students are similarly less likely to have remained in college
and earned a bachelor’s degree than their peers (Pascarella, Pierson, Wolniak, & Terenzini, 2004). To
address this disparity, institutions have increasingly developed programs to increase the academic
successes and retention of first generation college students. This study examinJournal of Accounting Education 47 (2019) 48–62
Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

Journal of Accounting Education

journal homepage: www.elsevier .com/locate / jaccedu
An examination of the psychometric properties of the Connor-
Davidson Resilience Scale-10 (CD-RISC10) among accounting
and business students
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaccedu.2019.01.002
0748-5751/� 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

⇑ Corresponding author.
E-mail addresses: kjsmith@salisbury.edu (K.J. Smith), djemerson@salisbury.edu (D.J. Emerson), Timothy.Haight@lmu.edu (T.D. Haight), sm

business.msstate.edu (S. Mauldin), bgwood@southalabama.edu (B.G. Wood).
Kenneth J. Smith a,⇑, David J. Emerson a, Timothy D. Haight b, Shawn Mauldin c, Bob G. Wood d
a Salisbury University, 1101 Camden Avenue, Salisbury, MD 21801, United States
b Loyola Marymount University, 1 Loyola Marymount University Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90045, United States
cMississippi State University, P.O. Box EF, MS 39762, United States
dUniversity of South Alabama, 307 N. University Blvd. #130, Mobile, AL 36688, United States

a r t i c l e i n f o a b s t r a c t
Article history:
Received 1 May 2018
Received in revised form 29 January 2019
Accepted 29 January 2019
Available online 10 February 2019

Keywords:
CD-RISC10
Accounting majors
Business students
Factor structure
Factorial invariance
Reliability
Validity
Using a sample of 546 undergraduate accounting and business students from four US uni-
versities, one on the East Coast, two in the South, and one on the West Coast, this study
examined the efficacy of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale-10 (Campbell-Sills &
Stein, 2007; CD-RISC 10) for use with accounting and other designated business majors.
The analyses included an examination of possible demographic differences in overall score,
the scale’s factor structure, the invariance of its factor structure across major and gender,
the scale’s reliability, and its convergent and divergent validity. The results indicate signif-
icant inter-major and gender differences in scores. Most troubling, female accounting
majors report the lowest resilience levels, significantly below those recorded for male
accounting majors, and male and female non-accounting majors. However, the scale has
a common factor structure. We further find that a two-factor solution provides a superior
fit to the data compared to the single factor structure used in most prior research.
Spearman-Brown reliability coefficients, item-total correlations, and coefficient alphas
each support the reliability of the items loading on the scale for the full sample, as well
as for each of the above-referenced demographic subsamples.

� 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
1. Introduction

This study assesses the psychometric properties of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale 10 (Campbell-Sills & Stein,
2007; CD-RISC 10) among a sample of accounting and other designated business majors. The results provide evidence of
the scale’s utility as aAcademic Engagement and Student Success: Do
High-Impact Practices Mean Higher Graduation Rates?
Sarah Randall Johnsona and Frances King Stageb

aInstitutional Research, Harvard Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; bHigher and
Postsecondary Education, New York University, New York, New York, USA

ABSTRACT
This study examined the relationship between 10 high-impact
practices and graduation rates at four-year public colleges and
universities in the United States. The Association of American
Colleges and Universities defined high-impact practices as
especially effective for student learning, engagement, and
career preparation in the 21st century. While advocacy for
these practices and their inclusion in undergraduate curricula
is growing, little research has examined their relationship to
institutional outcomes. Based on data from 101 participating
institutions, this study used both primary and secondary data
to investigate whether offering high-impact practices as
required for all students, required for some students, or
optional was related to an institution’s four or six-year gradua-
tion rate. The findings suggest that high-impact practices are
in widespread use across different institutional types but have
limited relationships with graduation rates. This study contri-
butes to the body of literature on college completion. Findings
suggest that offering high-impact practices may not lead to
increased graduation rates at public institutions.

ARTICLE HISTORY
Received 21 October 2016
Accepted 12 February 2018

KEYWORDS
Academic engagement;
college completion; high-
impact practices

Introduction

College completion became a prominent subject of public attention in the
United States during the past decade (Bowen, Chingos, & McPherson, 2009;
Obama, 2009; E. Porter, 2014). Financial constraints, concerns about
accountability, and desire for demonstrable outcomes put pressure on col-
leges and universities to increase graduation rates. Although the general
population entering college rose in number, the proportion of students
completing college degrees remained steady and, in some years, slightly
declined (Carey, 2004; Shapiro et al., 2015). The six-year completion rate is
about 50% (U.S. Department of Education, 2015), and the time taken to earn
a college degree in the United States has consistently risen since the mid-
1980s (Bound, Lovenheim, & Turner, 2007).

An additional, parallel concern in the national discourse is quality of
baccalaureate study. Some have suggested there are declines in writing

CONTACT Sarah Randall Johnson srjohnson@hbs.edu

THE JOURNAL OF HIGHER EDUCATION
2018, VOL. 89, NO. 5, 753–781
https://doi.org/10.1080/00221546.2018.1441107

© The Ohio State University

https://crossmark.crossref.org/dialog/?doi=10.1080/00221546.2018.1441107&domain=pdf&date_stamp=2018-07-10

instruction, critical thinking, quantitative skills, and moral reasoning (Arum
& Roksa, 2011; Bok, 2008). The National Commission on the Future of
Hi^ M ” JOURNAL OF PHENOMENOLOGICAL

” , . , ,-^ PSYCHOLOGY 45 (2014) 72-91

BRILL brill.com/jpp

Desire for Higher Education in First-Generation
Hispanic College Students Enrolled in a Graduate
Counseling Program

A Phenomenological Analysis

Tamara Olive
Department of Education, Sul Ross State University

tolive@sutross. edu

Abstract

Motivation to seek higher education is rarely examined in Hispanic first-generation
graduate students, those v̂ ihose parents have not attended college, and there is less
literature examining those whose desire for education extends to a master’s degree in
counseling. The purpose of this study was to conduct a phenomenological examina-
tion of the desire to attend college among first-generation Hispanic students enrolled
in a counselor education program. One-hour taped interviews were conducted with
three volunteer participants enrolled in a graduate counseling program at a Texas uni-
versity designated as a Hispanic-serving institution. Meaning units and constituents
were extracted, and a general structure was developed using the Descriptive
Phenomenological Method (Giorgi, 1985). The phenomenological analysis resulted
in one structure that identifies the influence of respected others; resilience and self-
efficacy; self-denial; a need for distinction and career satisfaction; spirituality; altru-
ism; and a view of commitment to a counseHng degree as a nonUnear process.

Keywords

graduate education – Hispanic college students – first-generation students
counselor education

Demographic data regarding enrollment and degree attainment of Hispanic
graduate students are readily available (American Council on Education,
2002; U.S. Department of Education, 2010). However, individual perspectives

I KONINKLIJKE BRILL NV, LEIDEN, 2014 [ DOI 10.1163/15691624-12341269

DESIRE FOR HIGHER EDUCATION IN FIRST-GENERATION 73

of first-generation Hispanic graduate students are less frequently examined.
Statistical reports fail to explain past motivation to seek higher education in
these students whose parents have not attended college. Further, although
studies have addressed factors such as language proficiency, academic suc-
cess, family influences, self-efficacy, and parental aspirations (Gándara, 1982;
Goldenberg, Gallimore, Reece, & Gamier, 2001; Zarate & Gallimore, 2005) asso-
ciated with Hispanic student college enrollment, there is a lack of literature
addressing the unique meanings within a lived experience for those students
whose desire for higher education extends beyond an undergraduate degree to
a master’s degree in counseling.

Although the number of first-generation Hispanic college students is
increasing (Saenz, Hurtado, Barrera, Wolf, & Yeung, 2007), Hispanic students
earned only 5.9% of the total 625,023 master’s degrees awarded in the United
States in academic year 2007-2008 (u.s. Department of Education, 2010).
This number represents an increase of 2% over a ten year period; however,
the United Census BuIdentify the purpose of the study.
16%

Does not evaluate the qualitative research approach for the scenario provided.

Partially evaluates the qualitative research approach for the scenario provided.

Accurately evaluate the qualitative research approach for the scenario provided.

Accurately evaluates the qualitative research approach for the scenario provided. The analysis is well justified, logical, and thorough.

Identify the statement of the problem.
16%

Does not evaluate the quantitative research approach for the scenario provided.

Partially evaluates the quantitative research approach for the scenario provided.

Accurately evaluates the quantitative research approach for the scenario provided.

Accurately evaluates the quantitative research approach for the scenario provided. The analysis is well justified, logical, and thorough.

Explain the limitations/implications of the study.
16%

Does not evaluate the literature review for the scenario provided.

Partially evaluates the literature review for the scenario provided.

Accurately evaluates the literature review for the scenario provided.

Accurately evaluates the literature review for the scenario provided. The analysis is well justified, logical, and thorough.

Describe the ethical considerations in the chosen research.
16%

Does not evaluate theory for the scenario provided.

Partially evaluates theory for the scenario provided.

Accurately evaluates theory for the scenario provided.

Accurately evaluates theory for the scenario provided. The analysis is well justified, logical, and thorough.

Provide the future research possibilities.
16%

Does not evaluate the ethical considerations for the scenario provided.

Partially evaluates the ethical considerations for the scenario provided.

Accurately evaluates the ethical considerations for the scenario provided.

Accurately evaluates the ethical considerations for the scenario provided. The analysis is well justified, logical, and thorough.

Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with the expectations for members of an identified field of study, using APA style and formatting.
20%

Fails to communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with the expectations for members of an identified field of study, using APA style and formatting.

Communicates in a manner that is partly scholarly, professional, and consistent with the expectations for members of an identified field of study, but inconsistently employs APA style and formatting.

Communicates in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with the expectations for members of an identified field of study, using APA style and formatting.

Communicates in a manner that is completely scholarly, professional, and consistent with the expectations for members of an identified field of study, using APA style and formatting few or no errors.




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